Just Put A Ring On It

Challenging myself everyday even with a standard interview of a classmate on the topic of two truths and a lie.

During the editing of this video, I demanded of myself, to learn Premiere Pro CS6 better, tinker more with Magic Bullet Looks, and even watch/practice some tutorials on After Effects to create the opening title and reveal slides. I can’t say the After Effects portions are steller, but they were a big leap to try and learn over the course of 10 hours of editing/tweaking.

I really enjoy editing in Premiere Pro along with Magic Bullet Looks!

In this short video interview with web narratives classmate, Christina Blocher, we come to wonder, does she have all the qualities that would garnish a marriage proposal or is she a heartbreaker?

Watch to find out.

By Jerry Englehart Jr.

Journey: Alive

The first video piece for Web Narratives was centered around a ‘Journey’. The ultimate objective of this assignment was to create a story arch with suspense, good pacing, and a reveal at the end. It was completely open ended and everyone in our class took an interesting approach. This is mine:

An internal monologue of a restless mind.

There are times we think of past events, people that have carelessly passed away, those long drives to clear your mind, or past and current lovers we can not disembark from. But it's all in the abstract; bits and pieces meshed together in a mixed, nonlinear timeline.

By: Jerry Englehart Jr.

Myanmar Community Church Part Two

In this small set of images I wanted to concentrate on the refugee children from the ethnic Chin group of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma. The Chin community in San Diego is predominately Christian, but they are children all the same – curious, full of energy, and impressionable.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comA young ethnic Chin refugee boy looks at a price tag after helping arrange items before Sunday’s church service with the Myanmar Community Church.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comA young ethnic Chin refugee girl looks around a car bumper while Pastor Ukte, first right, waits for more refugees to get ready for church. Pastor Ukte drives up to two hours total before and after Sunday’s service to pick up and drop off Myanmar (Burma) refugees that do not have transportion. 

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comAn ethnic Chin refugee mother uses a traditional sling method to carry her child with modern transportation reflected in the window of the building where the Myanmar Community Church holds Sunday service.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comA young ethnic Chin refugee boy runs toward the Myanmar Community Church van.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comEthnic Chin refugee children play in the courtyard of the building where the Myanmar Community Church holds its Sunday church service each week.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comA young ethnic Chin boy plays outside of the Myanmar Community Church building.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comYoung ethnic Chin refugee children answer questions during bible study.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.comAfter the conclusion of Sunday’s service for the Myanmar Community Church ethnic Chin refugees talk outside before heading home. Some would be driven home by Pastor Ukte and others were able to get rides with others.

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

San Diego Refugees of Burma

My introduction to the refugees of Burma in San Diego has been much slower than I originally thought, but this hasn’t been a bad aspect of the process. Yes, it has been very difficult to go into situations when the language barrier is beyond charades and yet it has been helpful too because the families I have met so far get to a point where they go back to their daily lives, ignoring the camera for those precious instances when real, genuine moments happen.

The second hardest part of this is trying to find the story within the language barrier or lack of story. I am in need of a younger refugee that knows Karen, Chin, Burmese, and/or Thai – the main languages that I have found most of these refugees know – that I can work with on a constant basis. Just this alone would help tremendously and they would have a definite paid job.

But what I do know so far is spirits have been joyful even when work has been scarce for the refugees I’ve met.

Group Dynamics

In the last six months I have been involved, as a director with Love For Alyssa, a non-profit organization founded by Jennifer Kaczmarek. The original intent of the organization was to “bring together a community of people in hopes of helping a little girl in need.” Our focus was clear, but we both knew we could do much more.

Therefore, during this time Jennifer and I began talking about expanding the non-profit organization outward. We were going to create a core group of photographers dedicated to health related stories we could visually tell in order to help raise awareness and raise funds for individuals or an organization. We also wanted to the share ideas, thoughts, contacts, and moral support between each other. The industry of photography is constantly evolving and we saw a reason to try something completely different outside of the traditional collective of photographers.

This evolution has taken hold. We have nearly completed becoming a 501c3 with the paperwork filed and just waiting for our final approval! This will open doors to opportunities we couldn’t imagine as individual photographers.

But, the greatest surprise has come through the vast network of social media. During all the paperwork filing Jennifer came upon photographer and writer, Robert Larson via the Flak Photo Network. After Jennifer contacted him, I met with Robert in person, and he has joined our mission, bringing along with him, his own expertise to the group dynamic. Robert is currently based in Los Angeles, California and working to raise funds for his long term project ‘Waiting for Haiti’. His vision of Haiti is arresting and his work as already garnered grants, awards, and worldwide attention.

Robert Larson - Waiting for Haiti

Jennifer will continue to document and raise funds for Alyssa. In the evolution, ‘Love for Alyssa’ will become a project under the new collective name.

Jennifer Kaczmarek - Love For Alyssa

I will also continue my work on ‘New Burma’ with the refugees of Burma in California and Kentucky.

Jerry Englehart Jr. - New Burma

More updates will be coming soon including the new name and a new website!

To read the official announcement by Jennifer Kaczmarek… please visit this link:

Introducing our new vision and people

 

Monster Jam Anaheim

The greatest learning experience I have had so far is that I am self assigning work to shoot while at ZUMA Press. This is critical right now because it is a good litmus test on how well I can find events and situations that will produce interesting visuals, how to jump over (sometimes under) the credentialing hurdles, and most of all how to be successful – 100% of the time. The third is the most crucial because as a freelancer I can’t bomb an assignment. There is no daily assignment cushion, which makes that very scary and a very real thought. Botch an assignment and probably lose a future income source.

The most fascinating aspect of this assignment, at Monster Jam in Anaheim, was to see how many people were recording or taking photographs with their cellphone cameras. If there was any feature at this event that was unavoidable it was people taking their own pictures all through the show. If none of these fans had such easy access to their own way of recording the event in front of them I kept wondering what types of human interaction would I have captured? But on the flip side it made feature hunting even harder (on top the abundance of securities that waved you away when you stood in or near an isle too long)  because interesting characters would be using their little cellphone camera to document the event too. I also wondered when would it become irrational to feature hunt reaction shots, in the crowds at sporting events, when all they are doing is camera phoning the event you need ‘reactions’ to…? Quite a thought!

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Spectators take photographs of the monster truck Grave Digger. It is Grave Digger’s 30th anniversary this year and the truck is still driven by Dennis Anderson. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Fans stand up and cheer after George Balhan the driver of Mohawk Warrior wins the championship race portion of the Advance Auto Part Monster Jam against Monster Energy driven by Damon Bradshaw. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Spectators at the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam filter into the stadium while some ticket holders have restaurant-style dinner service before the start of the event. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – A spectator covers his ears with both his hands during Monster Mutt Dalmation’s freestyle run at the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam Monster Truck show in Angel Stadium. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Two young fans with looks of anticipation watch the monster truck Grave Digger during its freestyle run at Angel Stadium for the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. Grave Digger would win the freestyle portion of the even with a top score of 28. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Two young fans with looks of anticipation watch the monster truck Grave Digger during its freestyle run at Angel Stadium for the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. Grave Digger would win the freestyle portion of the even with a top score of 28. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – One of the monster trucks exists the field after the end of the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam event at Angel Stadium. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – A long line of fans wait for a portion of the drivers to come outside the front of Angel Stadium to sign more autographs after the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam event. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Security blocks spectators from crossing the entrance and exit to the main floor of Angel Stadium because the monster trucks are leaving the stadium at the end of the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com

Jan. 28, 2012 – Anaheim, California, U.S. – Two drivers talk between themselves while driver George Balhan of Mohawk Warrior looks at his phone. Fans lined up to wait for a second chance to have merchandise signed by the monster truck drivers outside of Angel Stadium after the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam. (Credit: © Jerry Englehart Jr./ZUMAPRESS.com)

Myanmar Community Church Part One

I connected with the Myanmar, formally known as Burma, refugee community in San Diego last week. There is still the same gratitude and appreciation, but the most noticeable difference is the religious faith in the San Diego community is Christianity. It has been explained to me that the refugee community in San Diego is Christian because minority group’s population percentage is 70% Karen, 20% Chin, and 10% other ethnic minorities from Myanmar.

I can not wait to dig deeper into the community. Find their stories. And bring them to the surface because of the recent, positive political movements in Myanmar.

Jerry Englehart Jr.

Jerry Englehart Jr.

Jerry Englehart Jr.

Jerry Englehart Jr.